The story in details…

One day when I was soaking my feet on the shore, one of them came riding on a wave and rolled onto my big toe. An unexpected encounter that caught my attention.

It was all smooth and rounded, dark grey in color with a white stripe running across it from side to side.

So soft that it must have been rolling for a long time.

I threw it back into the sea, which was its place, so that it could continue on its way, but before reaching the water, suddenly, the pebble made a “CRREC” and split open like a walnut.

What came out of it grew and grew, making the little stone dance as she carried it up and up to the top.

It was a tall, red, pointed mountain that appeared before it with great momentum, often a rain of a thousand drops that covered it from top to bottom. 

From each drop that watered the mountain an idea was born, «PLUFF»… And all ideas can be drawn.

This is the superpower of illustration

An acrobatic swimmer appeared, some tweezers that became friends as soon as they saw each other, a forest of ball trees… And so on until reaching a thousand.

The mountain had become a floating island full of new inhabitants, plants and flowers and landscapes. And as It sailed out to sea, splashing drops and going ”PLUFS and PLUFS”, I’m sure I heard laughter and voices chattering.

 

*Pedrenland is a name with a mixed language but the essential PEDREN, comes from PEDRA which means stone in Catalan, my mother tongue.

Go to the island!

 

 

 

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